Digital Storm

Digital Storm to building gaming PCs, only a few brands have an established name in the market. Among them, Alienware and Digital Storm are the two famous ones. They both have different features, and the user should decide which one they prefer according to their needs. Most Digital Storm PCs are designed with a transparent casing. They contain RGB lights within the desktop that turn on with the PC, providing a quality look to the user. The size of desktop computers is larger than most of the other brands. This allows the user to easily upgrade the existing system without switching to a new one.

Digital Storm
Digital Storm

Digital Storm

Digital Storm laptops are slim in shape and extremely lightweight. The casing and external body of the laptop are made up of quality metals that protect the laptop from any wear and tear. Black is the most common color you will find in the available products. Another product by digital storm is a gaming console. The gaming console comes with a Blu-ray player and allows the user to upgrade its memory space. The LED lights within the console are designed with a multi-color combination that gives an illusion of a starry night sky when turned on. Digital Storm consoles are designed with quality multimedia software that allows for quick processing of action videos and high-end games.

Digital Storm is a manufacturing firm that designs and builds gaming computers. It specializes in hand-crafting PCs. The company does everything from inventory allocation, assembly, testing, and quality assurance in-house. They test every custom gaming computer with a series of stress-tests and benchmarks that analyze the processor, memory,

It’s no secret that California-based Digital Storm is well regarded within the gaming PC community. The hardware assembly company is known for catering to diehard enthusiasts with extreme tastes and perhaps a good deal of disposable income, though if you aren’t looking to break the bank, you can definitely find modest gaming rigs for reasonable prices on the Digital Storm website.

Digital Storm
Digital Storm

The custom machine that DS recently sent over for review is on the higher end, ringing up for a sub-total of $3,896 and a grand total (with tax and free 3-day shipping) of $4,251. Not cheap by any stretch of the imagination, but as noted below, when it comes to today’s most demanding games, this is a system built with little compromise:

One interesting thing about the Digital Storm experience is how the company keeps you in the loop during the entire PC building process. From placing the initial order to eventually receiving the put-together hardware, DS sends out play-by-play updates via email, broken out into various ‘stages’.

You’ll get messages each time your gaming PC enters a new stage, and that includes stuff like inventory procurement, assembly, benchmarking/stress testing, quality assurance and finally packaging. I honestly haven’t seen anything like this from other system integrators I’ve reviewed, and the addition gives the waiting experience a premium customer service touch.

While I don’t think this kind of communication minutiae is absolutely necessary for most people, I can envision Digital Storm’s detailed update stream being rather comforting to individuals who have dropped several thousand dollars on a new rig and want the most up-to-date information regarding their purchase.

You essentially get to ‘watch’ your gaming PC make its way from warehouse to your front door, and that is valuable. Additionally, included in that update email barrage is a handy Digital Storm setup video that walks you through the unpacking, as well as the cable and monitor hook-up process.

On the note of physical delivery, the order for my Digital Storm review unit was placed on September 21, shipped on September 23 and arrived on September 28. Pretty damn fast when considering the state of the PC hardware industry, how scarce components are and courier delivery delays due to labor shortages. Having noted that, I have no idea if my particular order was prioritized and fast-tracked due to the PR nature of my unique unit, but well done DS, nonetheless.

The gaming PC showed up virtually flawless and damage-free, minus a rogue retention clip that got bumped loose from the PCIe slot holding the graphics card. Digital Storm does use that infamous expandable foam to secure the internal components during transit, especially the precarious and valuable RTX 3080, but I have to say that Falcon Northwest spoiled me in this regard. FNW’s Talon case allows for dual-end GPU mounting and it’s way more secure in terms of shipping, sag and general use.

1 Comment

Leave a Reply