Pokemon Natures

Pokemon Natures rather than just being a superficial personality, Natures actually affect the growth of a Pokémon. Each nature increases one of its stats by 10% and decreases one by 10% (by the time it reaches level 100). Five natures increase and decrease the same stat and therefore have no effect. In most cases it is preferable to have a nature that decreases either Attack or Special Attack for Pokémon whose strengths are the opposite type of attack. Espeon, for example, favours Special moves, so it’s best to use a nature that decreases its Attack since it won’t be used.

Pokemon Natures
Pokemon Natures

Pokemon Natures

Pokemon Naturesand Shield introduce new items called Mints that change your Pokemon’s stat growth and stat potential the same way Natures do. You cannot purchase Mints until after you beat Pokemon Sword and Shield. Though Mints don’t change your Pokemon‘s Nature in that Pokemon’s flavor text, they still change the rate of the stat growth and that stat’s max as if that Pokemon had a different Nature. A Lonely Mint will affect a Pokemon the same way a Lonely Nature would.

For example, giving a Pokemon a Modest Mint will make its Sp. Attack growth high and its Attack growth low, which will be reflected in its summary. Its Sp.Attack stat will from then on be Red to mark its increased growth, and its Attack stat will be Blue to mark its lowered growth, as if its nature were Modest.

However, that Pokemon’s original Nature will still be reflected in its flavor text. Giving a Pokemon a Mint will retroactively affect its stats previously affected by its original Nature, as well. So, if a Pokemon’s stat was lowered by its previous Nature, it will raise after changing its stats with a Mint. Mints are stored in the Other Items pocket of your Bag.

Pokemon Natures
Pokemon Natures

Natures raise one stat and lower another, and it’s important not only to know what each nature raises and lowers, but which ones are more compatible with certain competitive roles. Knowing how they function in conjunction with certain Pokemon helps, so with every entry, alongside explaining the significance of the nature in question, an example will be given of a Pokemon that’s at its best with said nature.

Updated November 28, 2021, by Kyle Laurel: Competitive battling is getting some more traction with a new set of games coming out. With Brilliant Diamond and Shining Pearl getting their own meta, there are sure to be some new teams for players to construct. With that, here’s a rehashed look at natures and their role in competitive battling.

While every nature is technically equal in its role of raising and lowering a stat each, some are better than others from a practical standpoint. There are certain ones that provide much less functional use than others.

Exhibit A of basically unusable natures would be the ones that raise and lower the same stat, a.k.a. neutral natures: Bashful, Docile, Hardy, Quirky, and Serious. No matter what kind of Pokemon you’re building out, you’re missing out on a potential stat boost, and it’s generally much better to optimize select stats than be totally all-around.

A Pokémon’s Nature usually affects the value of two of its stats, ultimately increasing one of its non-HP stats (Attack, Defense, Special Attack, Special Defense, or Speed) by 10% and decreasing another by 10%. Starting in Pokémon HeartGold and SoulSilver, the stats increased or decreased by a Pokémon’s Nature have (respectively) a red or blue highlight on a Pokémon’s summary screen.

Natures also determine the Pokémon’s favorite flavor and its disliked flavor: Each stat is associated with a flavor, and each Pokémon’s favorite flavor is the one associated with the stat increased by its Nature, while it dislikes the flavor associated with the decreased stat. For example, since the Lonely Nature increases a Pokémon’s Attack stat (which is associated with the Spicy fla

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