Soul Food Near Me

Soul Food Near Me If you’re looking for something flavorful and filling, there are plenty of American soul food restaurants you should try. While the term “Soul Food” came about in the 60s and 70s from key actors in the Civil Rights Movement, like Malcolm X, soul food is a cultural invention rooted in the struggles of slavery. Using a combination of West African cooking techniques and an incredible ingenuity born from their strong will to live, enslaved peoples in the deep South cooked calorie-rich foods out of what slaveowners gave them. Breading and frying meats and vegetables and using meat, bones, and fat to add flavor are two key techniques in ensuring that enslaved people could replenish the calories lost during a long day working the cotton and sugar fields.

Soul Food Near Me
Soul Food Near Me

Soul Food Near Me

Soul Food Near Me While the beauty salon and barbershop closed two decades later, Willie Mae’s Scotch House expanded to include an award-winning menu of incredible Louisiana and Mississippi home cooking menu. Owner and founder Ms. Willie Mae received a James Beard Foundation Award for her classic Southern American cooking, while Food Network and the Travel Channel deem Willie Mae’s fried chicken the best in America. I had a fried chicken platter with a side of NOLA famous red beans and rice and a buttery, sweet, and a savory cornbread muffin. Located in Jackson, Mississippi, Bully’s Restaurant has been featured in Thrillist, Eater, USA Today, and Culture Trip as some of the best, most authentic Mississippi Delta-style soul food in the nation.

The exterior is an unassuming, hole-in-the-wall brick building with a homey, old-school southern dining room. While they serve crowd pleasures like fried chicken, catfish, and fried green tomatoes, Bully’s also serves more obscure and adventurous delta classics. Real soul food is about preservation and using every part of the animal so that nothing goes to waste. Bully’s Restaurant continues this tradition with its offerings of oxtail, pig’s feet, and ham hocks, to name a few.

Soul Food Near Me
Soul Food Near Me

Soul Food Near Me While this may put you off, they are all as flavorful, tender, and delicious as any mainstream meal, proving the artistry and creativity inherent in soul food. Named for owner Carl S. Redding’s beloved grandmother, Amy Ruth’s is a friendly Southern soul food restaurant in New York’s famous Black neighborhood of Harlem. Carl S. Redding and his cousins would spend the summers in Alabama helping their grandparents with household chores, which is where Redding learned from his grandmother Amy Ruth’s famous down-home cooking. Today you can taste the authentic generations-old Alabama family recipes in a colorful, jazzy café. The daily menu has specials, a whole list of breakfast waffles, omelets, and southern breakfast plates, and a lunch and dinner menu. You’ll want to try the Rev. Thomas Johnson waffle with fried catfish for a perfect combination of sweet and savory. 

For the first few weeks after moving to Brooklyn, I felt homesick. I longed for a meal that resembled something even remotely close to my grandma’s Sunday meals she’d cook when I was younger. To put it plainly, I missed soul food.

Soul Food Near Me

I was born and raised in Georgia and my palate craved collard greens cooked with ham hocks, fried chicken with hot sauce (legs are the best part, no debate here), and pork chops. But even though I was states away from my forever home, New York proved itself to have a soul food scene where I was reminded of who and where I came from.

Not to be confused with Southern comfort food, soul food has historic roots that differentiate it from other American cuisines. The legacy of soul food is marinated in tenacity and soaked in a pot of togetherness.

“Soul food is the Southern food that Black migrants took outside the south and transplanted in other parts of the country,” says soul food scholar and culinary historian, Adrian E. Miller. “Soul food is usually more intensely seasoned, relies on the use of a variety of meats, and usually borders the line between savory and sweet.”

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